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From the Other Side: A Unique Review of “A Yellow Rose Project”

From the Other Side: A Unique Review of “A Yellow Rose Project”

What comes to your mind when you imagine a pink grenade?

 

Do you imagine a small plastic toy painted in a “girlie” hue?

 

 Or do you envision the explosion of oppression, anger, frustration, sexism, and revolution?

 

These scenes and feelings filled my mind as I stood before a photo of such a weapon.

 

 It was hanging in the Sarah Spurgeon Gallery at Central Washington University.

 

 

Impressive Collaboration


Before, a contributing artist named Serrah Russell (@serrahrussell) spoke about A Yellow Rose Project.

 

To her, A Yellow Rose Project “is about being able to have and use your voice. Because that’s what artists do.

 

Russell and fellow artists Meg Griffiths and Francis Jakubek provided the opportunity.

 

 

In her words, one of the most exciting aspects of this project was the “sheer amount of people that are in it! I’m impressed by how much effort was put into awareness of the project.”

 

More than 100 artists contributed to A Yellow Rose Project, but one of them stood out the most to Russell.

 

In the gallery, I exposed my soul to Katie Benjamin’s Study 01 (the pink grenade).

 

Russell was asked, “are there any artists, in particular, you would like to talk about tonight?”

 

She said something about Benjamin’s work being able to evoke reactions to all these pink images.

 

Also, the reactions might reflect societal conditioning to see pink as softness.

 

It was the opposite of power and influence.

 

That seemed to be the case for me.

 

Women’s Warfare

 


I caught myself associating the color pink with inferiority.

 

I could feel my body close as I quickly and unconsciously crossed my arms.

 

Crossed arms were a good sign that the message contained in Study 01 had undoubtedly found its way to me.

 

During the lecture, Russell was asked, “as we walk through the gallery tonight, what should we focus on?”

 

“Be curious—question why a choice was made. There is an intention behind this,” she replied.

 

So naturally, I did.

 

“Why does this have such an effect on you?” I asked myself.

 

The apparent meaning behind the symbolism of a grenade is war.

 

From this perspective, it would seem like women have been at war for the last 100 years.

 

When a weapon of war is dressed in pink, it no longer symbolizes only war but also struggling and suffering.

 

Is this how women must feel in our society?

 

Does their struggle to have a voice only produce suffering, anger, and frustration?

 

Do women feel the only way to have a say in this world is to adopt warfare?

 

 Ponderings like those led me to some very uncomfortable places in my mind.

 

A Long History of a Little Progress


According to its website, A Yellow Rose Project is a photo collaboration. It is a collection of responses, reflections, and reactions to the 19th Amendment. Hundreds of women from across the United States contributed to the project.

 

Russell was asked about her thoughts while working on this project.

 

Her response?

 

 “A long history of a little progress.”

 

In her words, the significance of that quote is that “we still haven’t had a woman president.”

 

I can see why she admires Benjamin’s photos so much. Study 01 undoubtedly showcases the epitome of the last resort.

 


 

For more reviews, subscribe to my newsletter! 

 

And don’t forget to follow me on Instagram (@JVBarela)

From the Other Side: A Unique Review of “A Yellow Rose Project”

From the Other Side: A Unique Review of “A Yellow Rose Project”

What comes to your mind when you imagine a pink grenade?

 

Do you imagine a small plastic toy painted in a “girlie” hue?

 

 Or do you envision the explosion of oppression, anger, frustration, sexism, and revolution?

 

These scenes and feelings filled my mind as I stood before a photo of such a weapon.

 

 It was hanging in the Sarah Spurgeon Gallery at Central Washington University.

 

 

Impressive Collaboration


Before, a contributing artist named Serrah Russell (@serrahrussell) spoke about A Yellow Rose Project.

 

To her, A Yellow Rose Project “is about being able to have and use your voice. Because that’s what artists do.

 

Russell and fellow artists Meg Griffiths and Francis Jakubek provided the opportunity.

 

 

In her words, one of the most exciting aspects of this project was the “sheer amount of people that are in it! I’m impressed by how much effort was put into awareness of the project.”

 

More than 100 artists contributed to A Yellow Rose Project, but one of them stood out the most to Russell.

 

In the gallery, I exposed my soul to Katie Benjamin’s Study 01 (the pink grenade).

 

Russell was asked, “are there any artists, in particular, you would like to talk about tonight?”

 

She said something about Benjamin’s work being able to evoke reactions to all these pink images.

 

Also, the reactions might reflect societal conditioning to see pink as softness.

 

It was the opposite of power and influence.

 

That seemed to be the case for me.

 

Women’s Warfare

 


I caught myself associating the color pink with inferiority.

 

I could feel my body close as I quickly and unconsciously crossed my arms.

 

Crossed arms were a good sign that the message contained in Study 01 had undoubtedly found its way to me.

 

During the lecture, Russell was asked, “as we walk through the gallery tonight, what should we focus on?”

 

“Be curious—question why a choice was made. There is an intention behind this,” she replied.

 

So naturally, I did.

 

“Why does this have such an effect on you?” I asked myself.

 

The apparent meaning behind the symbolism of a grenade is war.

 

From this perspective, it would seem like women have been at war for the last 100 years.

 

When a weapon of war is dressed in pink, it no longer symbolizes only war but also struggling and suffering.

 

Is this how women must feel in our society?

 

Does their struggle to have a voice only produce suffering, anger, and frustration?

 

Do women feel the only way to have a say in this world is to adopt warfare?

 

 Ponderings like those led me to some very uncomfortable places in my mind.

 

A Long History of a Little Progress


According to its website, A Yellow Rose Project is a photo collaboration. It is a collection of responses, reflections, and reactions to the 19th Amendment. Hundreds of women from across the United States contributed to the project.

 

Russell was asked about her thoughts while working on this project.

 

Her response?

 

 “A long history of a little progress.”

 

In her words, the significance of that quote is that “we still haven’t had a woman president.”

 

I can see why she admires Benjamin’s photos so much. Study 01 undoubtedly showcases the epitome of the last resort.

 


 

For more reviews, subscribe to my newsletter! 

 

And don’t forget to follow me on Instagram (@JVBarela)

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